Articles

...Like a tree (Psalm 1:3) Online Newsletter

My Daughter the Kitty?

by Gabriel Pech

A couple months ago my almost-five-year old, beautiful, blonde-haired, blue-eyed daughter, Mykah, said to me over lunch, “Daddy, I want to be a boy!” This was a critical moment for me as a parent. I wasn’t surprised by her question, nor was I even caught off-guard. But it was still a critical moment. How would you handle this question?

Our culture today would suggest that my wife and I embrace her desire and immediately start calling her “Mike” and referring to her as a him and claim her as our firstborn son. The culture would not only suggest this, but would celebrate us as exemplary parents for embracing our daughter for “who he really is.”

Here’s the thing though… Earlier that morning she was a kitten named “Summer.” By Alicia Harvey (originally posted to Flickr as Blue Eyed Baby) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia CommonsAnd this morning she was a rescue dog named “Everest.” Who my daughter “really is” should not and cannot be determined by what she feels at any given moment. I kid you not, she switches characters throughout the day faster than I can keep up with; and in fact, I spend more time trying to figure out who I am as we play, than actually play.

She’s five–she doesn’t know what she wants. If I let her, she would eat cake for every meal and make herself sick by only drinking chocolate milk.

In this video, one of my favorite superhero actors, Chris Hemsworth (Thor) has a similar interaction with his daughter. How does he handle it? In his words, he tells his daughter, “You can be whatever you want to be.” It gets laughs from the audience but it’s not funny. He is pushing the same worldview that the recent kid movie, Zootopia, pushed: You can be whatever you want to be.

This worldview, while seemingly innocent enough, especially when said to a five-year-old, can have devastating effects, especially in regards to gender.

The big lie that Satan whispered into Eve’s ear in the garden was that God was withholding happiness from her, that He didn’t truly want what’s best for her (Genesis 3). In essence, Satan was saying that the sovereign God of the universe, the One who rules all things, did not actually know what was best for His creation; and that she, a mere finite being, could better determine her fate.By Internet Archive Book Images [No restrictions], via Wikimedia Commons

Do you see where I am going with this? That lie back in the garden is the same venomous lie that is being spewed today. The lie that says that somehow God messed up when creating you as male or female, and therefore you can, and should, decide for yourself. It’s the same lie wrapped up in new language and propagated not from a snake, but from the popular media.

So how did I reply to my sweet innocent little girl’s request to be a boy? I tenderly held her face, looked deep into her big blue eyes, and told her that God knew exactly what He was doing when He created her as a girl (Psalm 139:13 anybody?). I told her that living out her life as a girl will bring God great joy and glory, and then I affirmed all that is “girly” in her, showering her with love and affection. I did not rudely dismiss her request but rather told her of a sovereign God who loved her and made her to be a girl that glorifies Him. She smiled big, took a bite, and then told me we were now playing Rapunzel and I was the horse, Max.

As Christians, we must reject the worldview that lies and says, “You can be whatever you want to be,” as if that “whatever” is better than what you were originally designed for. We must teach our children that there is good and sovereign God who knew exactly what He was doing when He created them as a beautiful little girl or handsome little boy.

Gabriel Pech is a member of FCC.

Save

Posted in: Uncategorized

Leave a Comment (0) →

Suffering and Dying for the Glory of God

by Deanna Hanson

I recently lost my dad and my mother-in-law to Stage 4 illnesses. My dad was diagnosed with Stage 4 Liver Disease and died within 3 weeks. My mother-in-law’s diagnosis came and allowed us to enjoy 2 great years with her before her body was overcome by Stage 4 Lung Cancer. Both of my parents experienced death and suffering so differently. Our human nature does not want to endure hardship like a good soldier (2 Timothy 2:3), follow Christ’s example (1 Peter 2:21), or rejoice in suffering (Romans 5:3). But it is at Calvary, at the cross, where we meet suffering on God’s terms. My mother-in-law, Sue Hanson, achieved this for most of her life, but it was most evident during her last 2 years here on earth.

John and I attended the 2005 Desiring God’s National Conference in Minneapolis entitled “Suffering and the Sovereignty of God.” We were deeply affected by the messages. We heard testimonies from Joni Eareckson Tada, Steve Saint, and John Piper about the hope and joy that can come from immense heartache and affliction. Steve Saint explained how suffering is relative and different for each person. “My definition of suffering is our expectation divided by our experience.” He goes on to say that “people who suffer want people who have suffered to tell them there is hope.

William Blake [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

William Blake, “Pestilence”

They are justifiably suspicious of people who appear to have lived lives of ease. There is no doubt in my mind that this is the reason that Jesus suffered in every way that we do, while he was here. First Peter 2:21 says, ‘[Your] suffering is all part of what God has called you to. Christ, who suffered for you, is your example. Follow in his steps’ (NLT).” Sue understood that this was God’s sovereign plan for her life and followed Christ’s example. She lived her last two years demonstrating His love for others while she was sick, continuously serving and encouraging those around her. She radiated joy and hopefulness when she shared about the cancer that was spreading through her body. While she was suffering and dying, Sue did just as Philippians 2:3 says: “in humility count others more significant than yourselves.” Her example reminded me of what Joni said at this 2005 conference:

“To this you were called because Christ suffered for you, leaving you this kind of example that you should follow. He endured the cross for the joy that was set before him (Heb 12:2). Should we expect to do less? So then, join me; boast in your afflictions. Delight in your infirmities. Glory in your weaknesses, for then you know that Christ’s power rests in you (2 Corinthians 12:9). You might [have cancer] on all sides, but you’re not crushed. You might be perplexed, but you’re not in despair. You might be knocked down, but you’re not knocked out. Because it says in 2 Corinthians 4:7-12 that every day we experience something of the death of the Lord Jesus Christ, so that in turn we might experience the power of the life of Jesus in these bodies of ours.”

Let us learn from Sue and Joni and die to ourselves each morning and live in Christ for the glory of our great God!

If you would like to listen to the 2005 conference messages from this Series, the video and audio are available for free by clicking here: Suffering and the Sovereignty of God.

Deanna Hanson is a member of FCC.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Posted in: Uncategorized

Leave a Comment (0) →

The Mission of the Church

by William Judson

What is the role of the church in the Great Commission? Her role is to go out in the power of the Spirit, in the name of Christ, for the glory of the Father to make disciples of all ethnic groups in the world. Jesus, having been given all authority, promises to be with us as we seek to make disciples (converts) among all the nations. But that raises the question: to whom do we go? Do we go to those who already have access to the gospel, a church on every corner? Are the people in our offices and worksites “unreached?” To understand these questions, we need to go to the Scriptures.

The Great Commission is given to us in Matthew 28. Jesus sends us out in his name, to proclaim his death and resurrection. We see this authority and power manifested in the book of Acts. Specifically in Acts 1:8, Jesus recommissions those gathered by telling them that they will be his witnesses in Jerusalem, in all Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth. As Acts unfolds we see the apostles going into every town, proclaiming and reasoning with the Jews that Jesus is the Messiah and that he has risen. This proclamation results in persecution, which serves as God’s catalyst to send out workers into his harvest of the nations (Acts 11:19; Matt. 9:37-38).

By London Missionary Society, National Portrait Gallery, via Wikimedia Commons

Bechuana Congregation and David Livingston, via The London Missionary Society

God’s plan has always been for the nations. From his covenant with Abraham (Gen. 15; 17) to the Great Commission (Matt. 28; Acts 1:8), from Peter’s vision in Acts 10 to the return of Christ (Rev 5; 7). God is seeking to glorify himself among all peoples, tribes, and languages. God has promised that there will be a people from every tribe, language, and nation that will confess that Jesus is Lord and that the Father raised him from the dead. So we go to those who have never heard.

The unreached and unengaged are those with little to no access to the gospel. To bring their utter plight into view I want to paraphrase something I heard David Platt, President of the International Mission Board, say at a conference. He said, “If every Christian in the world were to go out and share the gospel with every person they knew, and that by God’s grace every person truly repented and believed, and then they told every person they knew, and so on, there would still be 2.9 billion unreached and unengaged peoples in the world.” Currently, there are 2.9 billion people in the world who are not giving the glory due to God. There are approximately 7.5 billion people in the world, most of whom, if we’re honest, aren’t Christians. But within that group, about 40%, have never heard the gospel of Jesus Christ. They have no access to the Scriptures or a local church. They have probably never met a Christian. They stand condemned before God unless they repent and believe in Christ as Lord and Savior.

In Romans 10, Paul states: “How, then, can they call on him they have not believed in? And how can they believe without hearing about him? And how can they hear without a preacher? And how can they preach unless they are sent?” As a church, we need faithful senders and faithful goers. We need those to be sent to those who have never heard. We need one another to reach the unreached. We need one another to accomplish Matthew 28 and Romans 15:20. Our aim should be to reach those where Christ has not been named until we have no more work left in this world.

William Judson is a member of FCC.

Posted in: Uncategorized

Leave a Comment (0) →

Penned, 20 March 2017, thoughts

I am thankful for this moment,
I am thankful for this time.
As I look upon your peaceful face,
And write this simple rhyme.

I am thankful for this moment,
I am thankful for this time.
I pray for your sweet precious soul
With each and every line.

Additional lines penned July, 2017

I am thankful for these moments,
I am thankful for this time.
I praise God He has saved you
In His perfect plan, not mine.

I am thankful for these moments,
I am thankful for these days.
I pray that you keep seeking God
In all your will and ways.

Accompanying note, when you sought baptism. . .

Dear Daughter,
The occasion for this poem is this:

I had gone into your room to say, “Good-night.” You were sleeping. Your peaceful rest was significant to me in the midst of our storms. After so many nights of slipping in to see you gazing out the window, troubled, this was such a delightful night.

But, as I wrote it, I knew I could not finish the poem, as we were, in our then-present state. I had to keep thanking God for each moment and thanking Him for such a time as this. I had to keep praying for your soul, dear.

God was gracious to respond to these pleas rather directly (though it seemed to me it might never come). My faith wavered frequently this past year, but God is faithful. He alone softened your heart. I couldn’t. He alone saved you.

Now, I could simply breathe a sigh of relief and thank Him for His perfect plan. Your adventure has just begun, however, and God is faithful to complete it. However much I love you, God’s love is infinitely more and far better than you could ask for or imagine. Seek Him first! Love, M

This contribution submitted anonymously from a member of FCC. 

 

Posted in: Poetry

Leave a Comment (0) →

Teaching What is Good: Part 1: Kindness

By Whitney Standlea

In recent years, God has constantly shown me just how amazingly kind He is, and how that real, genuine kindness should flow from me to others.  I have seen just how little that is the case.

Every time I read Ephesians 4:31-32, I am again stricken by my constant struggle to be kind and tender-hearted to my children and husband.  With this constant struggle in my own life, I assume many of you struggle with this as well. I hope these thoughts on this challenging word will be an encouragement and help to you in your pursuit of Christ-likeness.

Cultivating Kindness: Fertilizer, Compost, and other Good Stuff Kindness is something that needs to be cultivated within us.  To grow a fruitful harvest of kindness, it has to be rooted in good, rich soil. We find the root of kindness toward those around us in the kindness God has extended to us. Psalm 145:17 says “The Lord is righteous in all His ways and kind in all His works.”  I would encourage you to read this Psalm to be reminded of some of the kind ways of our mighty God.  All His works are kind, but we see the pinnacle of kindness in God’s compassion and mercy in that while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us. We see His kindness again and again as He faithfully meets all of our needs and tenderly sanctifies us despite our weakness, sin, and failure.  It is God’s kindness toward us that provides good heart-soil for extending kindness outward.  So, I ask you the question Joyce Juhnke posed to me:  “Do I see God’s kindness?”  Do you see it?  Stop and think about it.  Take time to look for it in what He has done and what He is presently doing in your life.

Tending the Garden: Remember that kindness starts in the home, where it is certainly the hardest! Do you have a roommate? A spouse? A sibling? A parent? A co-worker? A child?  These are the people we interact with the most, and we should actively seek to extend kindness to them. But just as growing plants require pruning and guiding, kindness is a work that has to be actively developed in our relationships. I love Joyce’s observations that if older women are to teach younger women to be kind, then it must not be natural! Knowing, being, doing, and excelling at kindness isn’t our natural disposition. We must seek and strive to do it and to learn how to be skilled at kindness.

So how do we strive for kindness to others?  What does it look like?  What are some skills and tools for kindness in our lives?

Some keys to kindness are:

—The Tongue: One might say this is the ultimate tool of kindness.  Scripture has much to say about the impact of kind words from our mouth.  And we all know that kind words aren’t always about the words themselves, but also the tone and volume of what comes from our lips.  The virtuous woman of Proverbs 31 has “the law of kindness” always on her lips.  Check out Proverbs 15:1, 25:15, and 31:26. Do you actively choose to speak words that give grace to those who hear you?  Are your words spoken with gentleness and love?

—Acts of Service: Kindness is more than our words and includes the acts we do to show love to others.  Toilet leaning, meals for the sick, cards of encouragement, a hug, a phone call to a lonely friend are all expressions of kindness that can mean a lot to others.  Unsure of what would be kind to do for someone?  What would you have others to do for you?  That’s a great place to start!  We also can grow in our knowledge of how to be kind as we face our own difficult seasons and remember what acts of kindness meant the most to us then.

—Enjoying the Fruit: The Proverbs listed above reference the direct effect that kind words have on our relationships.  A kind mouth can certainly dissipate conflict and tension in our homes.  But more than that, kindness can ultimately turn others to the source of our own kindness:  Christ!

Joyce shared with me a beautiful story of the Lord’s kindness through others.  Some friends came into town to visit them when they were in seminary and struggling financially.  It seemed impossible to provide food for this family on the Juhnke’s tight funds.  They took their needs to the Lord, trusting that He would take care of them.  When the family arrived to stay with them, they had brought a side of beef for the Juhnkes!  This amazing act of kindness from some believers was also an act of kindness from the Lord that demonstrated and affirmed His faithfulness to the Juhnkes.

After exhorting men, women, and bondservants in Titus 2, we are urged to do these things “so that in everything [we] may adorn the doctrine of God our Savior.”  Our kindness, which is fueled by God’s kindness toward us, ultimately points others back to the kindness of our Savior. Let us be diligent to cultivate kindness in our life! “He has told you, O man, what is good; and what does the LORD require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God?”  (Micah 6:8)

*Thank you to Joyce Juhnke and Allison Dull for providing the content to prepare this article.

Whitney Standlea is a wife, mother, elementary music teacher at Faith Christian Academy and a member of Faith Community Church.

Posted in: Women's Ministry

Leave a Comment (0) →

Ain’t No Mojo

By Matt Greco

By the time this article is published, the 2015 Major League Baseball season will be underway.  It is also very likely that no matter how the Kansas City Royals start off the year, Kansas City baseball enthusiasts will be talking about last year’s wonderful season.  It was a wonderful, magical season!

The Royals had a pretty good season going into the last few weeks of the year.  There were some ups and downs, but they eventually found themselves in a one-game play “in” with a chance to go into the postseason.  The winner of this game would be the Wildcard. This is where the magic really started. To begin their record-setting postseason, the Royals played an astounding, come-from-4-runs-behind, 12-inning, nail-biter to defeat the Oakland A’s!  The Boys in Blue went on to set an MLB record of winning 8 straight postseason games and set another MLB record of winning 4 extra-inning postseason games.  Eventually, the Royals played and lost to the San Francisco Giants in a seven-game World Series, the Royals first World Series since 1985.  But they had plenty of help;   they had plenty of mojo that was happening all across Kansas City!

What do I mean mojo? After the Royals beat Oakland, I overheard some mojo recall that helped explain why the Royals won.  It went more or less like this:

—When the Royals got behind, I started studying my  Greek, and then we started coming back, so I studied my Greek until we won!

—After the Royals got behind, I went to bed.  When I woke up, I learned we had won!

—It looked like we were going to lose the game, and it put me in a bad mood, so I got snarky with my wife, and we started to argue. As we argued, the Royals came back, and we eventually won.

Now each of these comments is from someone who would be considered a maturing Christian man, who is biblically literate and theologically sound.  Yet, when it came to the Royals, they all had their mojo going! They all referred to the Royals as “we.”  In fact each of these gentlemen stated they would be doing the same thing next game (studying Greek, going to bed early, getting snarky with the wife) in order to help the Royals win. This fascinated me, so I asked a group of otherwise maturing Christian men, who are biblically literate and theologically sound if they ever had or did any mojo before they or their favorite team played a game.  Their answers astounded me!  The answers went something like this:

–If we were on a winning streak, I would wear the same socks until we lost.

–If my team was winning, I would watch the next game on the same TV I was watching when they won.

–I always went to bed at the same time before a game and always ate the same breakfast on game day.

–I never watched TV or read the paper on game day.

–I would go to mass on game day.  On the way out of the church, I would get an extra helping of holy water and then touch all my major joints with the holy water to keep from getting injured.

—I am not superstitious, so no mojo, but I always ate the same pregame meal at exactly the same time, and then I would warm up exactly the same way, but I am not superstitious. (yeah right)

So, what was your mojo to help the Royals?  Or what is your mojo to help your favorite team win?  Do you put on your favorite sweatshirt, have the same pregame ritual, eat the same snacks, use the same TV?  When the Royals lost their first postseason game, one of the aforementioned maturing Christian, biblically literate, and theologically sound men came into work and stated, “I know why the Royals lost.” We looked at him with collective hope in our eyes. “My buddy took his girlfriend to the game, it was her first game ever, and she doesn’t even like the Royals!!” The collective “NO” was deafening!  How could she?!  Worse yet, how could he??!!

I recently watched a commercial where a stranger, carrying his own chair,         showed up in a couple’s apartment.  He explained that last year this was his apartment, and he sat right there in that chair, and the team won the championship.  The couple looked at the stranger, looked at each other, and then shook their heads with approval and asked him if he would like a snack.  What is weird is that I didn’t think it was weird!  I got it.

Okay, time for a reality check.  The truth for me and you and for all those who have helped their teams keep a streak alive, come out of a slump, or win that championship game is that there ain’t no mojo!  That is correct; let me repeat, THERE AIN’T NO MOJO!

The only reason the Royals or the Chiefs or the Chicago Cubs ever won or lost a game or a  championship is because they had more or less runs or points than their opponents at the end of the playing time.  The exception may be the Cubs; they may indeed be cursed.

Why write about superstition and lucky sweatshirts and mojos in a church newsletter?  The reason is that sometimes Christians or would-be Christians approach life in Jesus Christ with their lucky socks on.  People use their “Christian Mojo” to try to get into a relationship with Jesus Christ or to get closer to Jesus Christ. Here are some examples:

—If I can just have my quiet time, then I will be set for the day.

—I know I’m not giving enough, but when I get over (fill in the blank), then I will start giving more.

—I may not be perfect, but I haven’t (fill in the blank) yet, so I am not so bad.

—If I could just do this or that, etc. / if I could just stop doing this or that, etc.

Now, here is the reality: THERE AIN’T NO MOJO  in the Christian life.  No amount of being good or giving of money or  serving on  committees or  not doing  this or doing that will bring you into a relationship with Jesus Christ. No amount of being good or giving money or wearing your John MacArthur hat will make Jesus love you more once you are in a relationship with Him. As Pastor Tim takes us through the book of Romans, he has taught us, and we have learned and are learning:

  • Rom. 3: 23 for all have sinned and fall short of  the glory of God
  • Rom. 5: 8 But God shows His love for us, in that while we were sinners, Christ died for us
  • Rom. 6: 23 For the wages of sin is death, but the free gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord
  • Rom. 8: 1 There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus.
  • Rom. 10: 9–10 because if you confess with your mouth Jesus as Lord, and believe in your heart that God raised Him from the dead, you will be saved.
  • Rom. 12: 1–2 I appeal to you therefore, brothers, by the mercies of God, to present your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and acceptable to God, which is your spiritual worship. Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewal of your mind, that by testing you may discern what is the will of God, what is good and acceptable and perfect.

It is God’s glory, it is God’s mercy, it is God’s free gift, it is Jesus Christ declaring that we are not condemned, it is through God’s mercies, and it is God’s will.  If you are a part of God’s team (saved by grace through faith), then He has a part for you to play.  It is not about your lucky sweatshirt or your pregame routine; it is about God’s Holy Spirit working in us, and you and me working with Him.

In Philippians 2:12b–13, Paul writes, “… work out your own salvation with fear and trembling, for it is God who works in you, both to will and to work for his good pleasure.”  It is not working for our salvation, but working out (exercising) our salvation in Christ.

So join us here at Faith Community Church, knowing that God is working in and through us.  Exercise your spiritual worship here at FCC, and we will all win!  And, just in case, keep those lucky socks handy if the Cubs are close in September.

Sincerely and in Christ,

Matt Greco – Headmaster, Faith Christian Academy

Posted in: Christian Living

Leave a Comment (0) →

Book Review: Embracing Obsurity

Review by John Worley

Embracing Obscurity                            

If you read one book this year, this should be the one.  It confronts our conditioning in this society to equate our worth and purpose in life with getting recognition from others, gaining status among others and achieving influence or authority over others. The author contrasts this with our role as Christians being that of a servant to God and others, revealing His greatness rather than trying to establish our own.

Other than the Bible itself, this is the most personally challenging book I have read in many years. I may have said  a few things more carefully than the author did, but he does an excellent job scripturally with a difficult subject.  If I had written a book myself, I would wish this to be the one. There are copies available in the church bookstore. The cost financially is little ($2), but the cost in being honest with yourself may be high. Believe me, it is worth it.

John Worley was an FCC Elder and the beloved husband of Judy Worley.

 

Posted in: Book Review

Leave a Comment (0) →

Book Review: These Are the Generations

By Susan Verstraete

Grandmother Bae burned all three Bibles that her family owned. All night long she sat by the fire, tearing two or three pages at a time out of the book she loved and feeding it to the flames.  A North Korean State Security Officer could knock at any time, which made keeping the books just too dangerous.

Can you imagine what was going through her mind as she burned the sacred pages? Did tears stream down her face? Did she wish she had memorized more? And what was Grandfather Bae thinking as he guarded the door until it was finished? How could he lead his family without the Word? How could God save their family or the rest of North Korea when Scripture was outlawed?

These are the Generations tells the exciting and heart-wrenching story of the next three generations of the Bae family, Chinese Christians who escaped to North Korea to flee persecution by the Japanese after World War 2.

I’ve read a great number of Christian biographies, but this one struck me as unique in its honesty about the extremely difficult choices faced by believers under persecution. For example, some Christian families actually hid their beliefs from their own children for fear that the children might slip up in public and bring the Security
Office to the family doorstep. Others, like the Bae family, felt they had to burn God’s Word. A Christian mother asked her son to steal to keep the family from starving, and her believing son did what she asked.  The Pastor hid in fear when the Japanese army came to burn down his church, and no one spoke openly about Christ.

I kept asking myself, “What would I have done? Where’s the line between protecting my family and betraying my faith?”

The only criticism I have of the book is that the gospel is not clearly explained in this narrative. At times it sounds as if being a Christian is equivalent to obeying the Ten Commandments, for example, and Mr. Bae never mentions Christ. But Mrs. Bae does mention Him later in the book, and I think that this oversight may be attributed to the lack of systematic teaching in their lives rather than to a completely faulty understanding of redemption. Still, while I heartily recommend reading These are the Generations as a family, I wouldn’t  let a preteen read it alone without making sure to explain that we all often believe more than we articulate.

Susan Verstraete is the Church Secretary at FCC.

 

Posted in: Book Review

Leave a Comment (0) →

Welcoming the Broken

By Julie Gancshow

“You are the salt of the earth; but if the salt has become tasteless, how can it be made salty again? It is no longer good for anything, except to be thrown out and trampled underfoot by men. You are the light of the world. A city set on a hill cannot be hidden; nor does anyone light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on the lamp stand, and it gives light to all who are in the house. Let your light shine before men in such a way that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father who is in heaven.”
Matthew 5:13–16 (NASB)

How do you decide who to minister to? What are your criteria for those to whom you will reach out a helping hand? Does your church have an open hand toward people who have troubled pasts or are known to be emotionally unstable or undergoing treatment for psychiatric disorders?

Unfortunately, many pastors and church leaders hesitate to embrace those suffering with emotional problems or those labeled as problematic people. It has become accepted to send them to the local secular counselor rather than take an interest in rendering aid to them.

Because there is little to no teaching on this subject, the church people don’t know what to do with these souls either, so they do nothing other than sadly shake their heads and offer to pray.

For the most part, people with emotional problems or psychiatric diagnoses are simply avoided in our churches. It could be because of fear of exposure, as though they think a psychiatric diagnosis or emotional problem is contagious like the flu or a cold. It could be because they are unsure of the stability of such people, or they fear some violent outburst.

I am sorry to say that I have also seen these people discouraged from attending church at all! There are simply some individuals who don’t want that kind of a person in their church. As a result, they are marginalized and pushed out of the very place they need to be to find healing for the soul.

May I challenge you today to look for possible ways to minister to a person who would otherwise be a “hopeless case?” There are many of them out there! They are the people psychology has written off and cast out of the system with nothing more than a prescription for medications. They have been fed diagnosis codes and stripped of hope to ever be considered “normal.”

These people are the most helpless and broken among us, and they are also fertile ground for the hope and help that comes from the gospel of Jesus Christ. As biblical counselors and disciplers we bring the message of complete sufficiency of the Word of God and the miraculous love of a Savior who heals. God specializes in broken people; in fact, He prefers us that way.

We do not shy away from accepting what would be considered the tough counseling cases, and we believe the love of God and the truth found in His Word can penetrate the most difficult circumstances. It may require that you get a little dirty in the process and maybe even reach out to other organizations and people for help in ministering to this population.

Become the place of refuge for those hurting souls who desire to look at their problems from the Word of God. Ask them if they are interested in seeing what the Bible has to say about their troubles. Many are willing but have not had anyone take an interest in them before.

If you adopt this mindset and begin to reach out of your comfort zone, our church will become known as the place for hurting people to go. We will develop a reputation in the community as caring and compassionate people who live what they believe and are shining lights of hope in a very dark world.

Julie Ganschow is the director of Reigning Grace Counseling Center and a member of FCC.

Posted in: Biblical Counseling, Christian Living

Leave a Comment (0) →

Giving is Grace

By John Worley

After pastoring for 20 years, I did project fundraising for a   Bible College for 7 years and for a missionary organization for another 7 years. Most nonprofit Christian ministries employ many of the world’s ways of motivation for giving money. Why? The world’s approach is commonly used because it seems to get results, but sometimes with the sacrifice of integrity.

What should be the approach in reminding us of our accountability in giving? The same means employed in our church to hold us accountable in all other aspects and roles of life, the Word of God.

Basically, a steward is one who manages gifts on loan from God, answering to Him for his attitude about and utilization of those gifts. These may be the spiritual gifts God gives every believer for the work of the gospel and the building up of one another in the faith, or they may be financial resources entrusted to us while on earth. These gifts are grace, and we are accountable for the grace given us by God. Our world believes that money is the medium for measuring value.

The Bible, however, teaches us of the unseen evidence of spiritual and relational realities that have true and lasting value. These can give contentment, with or without money.

There is, of course, a practical side to money. It is, in effect, the fluid form of things; it makes property portable and serves as a medium for exchange of both material things and services. For this reason, most people come to view money as what matters most, that is the objective for life’s enjoyment. The status or influence that comes with money, and the so-called security of money, they view as their motivation in achieving this objective. Consequently, they buy things they do not need, with money they do not yet have, from people they do not even trust.

Our society has come to think of money only in terms of accumulating and spending, like the farmer who desired to make more money so he could buy more land, so he could plant more corn, so he could sell more hogs, so he could buy more land, plant more corn and so on. The Bible, however, deals with money mostly in the context of giving. When Jesus taught his

disciples about living for God, he invariably ended up teaching them about giving to God and to others. Half to two-thirds of our Lord’s parables deal with our attitude toward and responsibility for material possessions.

In 2nd Corinthians 7, Paul explained the difference between worldly sorrow and godly sorrow.  In the next two chapters, he taught the difference between worldly charitableness and biblical giving.  2nd Corinthians 9:6-8 tells us,

Now this I say, he who sows sparingly shall also reap sparingly, and he who sows bountifully shall also reap bountifully. Let each one do just as he has purposed in his heart, not grudgingly or under compulsion, for God loves a cheerful giver. And God is able to make all grace abound to you, that always having all sufficiency in everything, that you may have an abundance for every good deed.

Verse 8 gives a promise, but one that is conditioned upon its context. There are two conditions to the promise of verse 8. One is the bountiful participation of verse six and two is the cheerful attitude of verse 7. The promise is abundant grace; all-sufficient provision. This gives grace for all-sufficient contentment with what we have, all-sufficient confidence in the Lord who gives it and all-sufficient convictions about how we should use that which he gives.

Is this bountiful giving from God intended for the abundance of things for ourselves? No. Rather, Paul says, it is for the enablement to undertake every good deed (verse 8c).  Christ Himself is our example, as indicated in verse 9. “He scattered abroad, He gave to the poor, His righteousness endures forever (from Psalm 112:9).  Verse 10 tells us, “Now he who supplies seed for the sower and bread for food, will supply and multiply your seed for sowing and increase the harvest of your righteousness” (taken from Is. 55:10 and Hosea 10:12 and providing the sowing/reaping principle of verse 6).  We are doing the sowing, but God provides the seed. The reaping is not in material things, but rather reaping a harvest of righteousness (vs 10c).  This is the same truth presented earlier in verse 6, that “…you may have abundance (“increase” in vs 10) for every good deed.”  These acts are done in right relationship with God and with right intentions. That is, in submission and in sacrifice through service and giving. It is this right attitude in our giving that God loves (vs 7 “cheerful giver”). The harvest (results) is our increasing in right behavior and increasing in developing in right character. We honor God by purposing in our heart how much and when we give, and God provides the righteous enablement to us. The reason for our giving (vs 7) is that God loves it (that is, it pleases Him). The resource for our giving (vs 10) is out of what He supplies (vs 8), that is, all-sufficiency in everything. We sow in attitude and service and we reap spiritual enablement and spiritual, material and physical contentment.

A promise we are all familiar with is Philippians 4:19: “and my God will supply all your needs according to his riches in glory.”  Yet this, like the 2nd Corinthians 9:6-10 passage,  is a conditional promise. The preceding context of Philippians 4:13-18 reveals that this promise of God supplying all our needs is conditioned upon our meeting the needs for ministry as the Philippians did towards the Apostle Paul. They were actively engaged in sacrificially, voluntarily and thankfully responding to the opportunity. The conditional promises of 2nd Corinthians 9:6-10 and Phil. 4:13-19 are tied to the practice and the practicality of our present, responsive obedience to God-given opportunities, and to our enjoyment of our relationship with God through Christ our Lord.

2nd Corinthians 9:7 identifies how we are to give, “just as he has purposed in his heart.”  To have “purposed” is to have chosen beforehand.  “Heart” is used here in parallel to the word “mind,” as it is in 2nd Corinthians 4:6 where it says that God has put the light of the knowledge of the glory of God “in our hearts” (minds).  Chapter 9:7 goes on to present two negatives and one positive truth about giving. It must be “not grudgingly” (that is not with regret or grief over the giving, and not to view it as a loss) and “not under compulsion” (that is out of mere obligation, duty or embarrassment). Rather, to give cheerfully is to have joy over the privilege of the opportunity.

We are in the midst of raising funds for our new building. How should we each respond? In accord with a Christian liberty principle Romans 14:5 “let each man be fully convinced in his own mind.”  Make a deliberate, predetermined response based on personal conviction before God (read Romans 14:17-19, 22-23).  As an American businessman was visiting a pastor in Korea several years ago they came across an unusual scene for the American. A strong young Korean was in a field pulling a plow with straps upon his shoulders, while his father guided the plow. The American commented, “they must be very poor.” “Yes, they are” replied the pastor. “Do you remember the small new church that we just passed? The people of this village built it themselves and the family had no money to give, so they prayed about their desire to participate. They then gave what they had, their most valued possession. They sold the ox and gave the money to the project.” We might not need to choose to postpone buying a new car or to take a less expensive summer vacation in order to give. Some will give out of their abundance and some will give out of their meager assets. The amount given by one person may differ substantially from another, and yet the sacrifice may proportionately be the same. As Pastor Tim reminded us recently, we serve a God who can do all things, including things which seem improbable and things which seem impossible.

John Worley was a former FCC elder,  the beloved husband of Judy and father of Jackie Rebiger.

 

Posted in: Christian Living

Leave a Comment (0) →
Page 1 of 12 12345...»