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Why Aren’t My Rest Days Restful?

Have you ever begun your work on Monday and felt so worn-out that it couldn’t possibly be the beginning of the work week? Then you thought about your Saturday and Sunday and couldn’t remember what would have made you so tired this Monday morning? On the flip side, has there ever been a Monday in your life that, though you were busy all weekend, you were still able to face with energy? I know I have experienced both kinds of Mondays, and I’m sure you have too. Rest is something most people do not think they need to be taught about. Many would say, “It’s not getting into bed that I struggle with, it’s the getting out.” Although over-work is a common problem, I believe that many of our struggles with exhaustion are due to the wrong kind of rest. You can do nothing all day and still not feel rested. For this reason, I believe we as Christians need a better understanding of rest that we might live more energetically to the glory of God. My goal in writing this is to persuade you that rest is not so much the absence of activity, but the freedom from our daily duties to work and toil, that we might actively pursue that which satisfies us most in Christ. In order to do this, I will look at two key biblical passages concerning rest, Deuteronomy 5:12-15 & Hebrews 4:9-13, then finish with some applications that will aid us in ending our restless rest.  

 A Theology of Rest  

In the retelling of the Ten Commandments, Moses exhorts the Israelites:  

“Observe the Sabbath day, to keep it holy, as the LORD your God commanded you. Six days you shall labor and do all your work, but the seventh day is a Sabbath to the LORD your God. On it you shall not do any work, you or your son or your daughter or your male servant or your female servant, or your ox or your donkey or any of your livestock, or the sojourner who is within your gates, that your male servant and your female servant may rest as well as you. You shall remember that you were a slave in the land of Egypt, and the LORD your God brought you out from there with a mighty hand and an outstretched arm. Therefore the LORD your God commanded you to keep the Sabbath day” (Deuteronomy 5:12-15).  

In this text, we learn three unique reasons why we are to rest (Keller). First, we take a Sabbath rest as a Celebration of our Design. We learn in the Creation account in Genesis that God worked for six days, then rested on the seventh. In the passage above we learn that we are to have a day of rest that models exactly what God did in the beginning. We are to reflect God’s image by resting every seventh day as He rested. Our rest, then, is a celebration of our likeness to God as His image bearers. We learn here that rest is not rooted in the Law but in the Creation account. Secondly, we take a Sabbath rest as a Declaration of our Freedom. The flow of the argument in verse 15 is that Israel is to remember their slavery in Egypt and the Lord’s deliverance. Then the Bible says, “Therefore, the LORD your God commanded you to keep the Sabbath day.” Here we see the command to rest is to reflect God’s mighty ability to deliver His people. Because God freed Israel, they were to rest in celebration of His mighty work. The principle for us here is that God is always the Deliverer of His people and rest is a celebration of His might, not ours. Therefore, we are not to seek refuge in working for money without rest, trying to save ourselves. Rather, we rest as a declaration of our freedom from all worldly bondage. God has delivered us and we do not have to prove ourselves or think we are our ultimate provider. God freed us from this bondage which is so common to man. This leads us to the third underpinning of our rest. We rest as an Act of Trust. To rest means we are not working (an obvious deduction), and not working means no money. Tim Keller says it well, “To practice the Sabbath is a disciplined way to remember that you are not the one who keeps the world running, who provides for your family, not even the one who keeps your work projects moving forward.” Therefore, rest is yet another way God’s people show the world they trust God and revere Him.  

Now turning to the New Testament, the author of Hebrews writes:  

“So then, there remains a Sabbath rest for the people of God, for whoever has entered God’s rest has also rested from his works as God did from his. Let us therefore strive to enter that rest, so that no one may fall by the same sort of disobedience. For the word of God is living and active, sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing to the division of soul and of spirit, of joints and of marrow, and discerning the thoughts and intentions of the heart. And no creature is hidden from his sight, but all are naked and exposed to the eyes of him to whom we must give account” (Hebrews 4:9-13).  

Here is the incredible teaching that for God’s people there is a greater Sabbath rest than what Moses spoke of in the Ten Commandments. This is the rest believers have in Christ. The flow of the argument reveals that there has been no lasting Sabbath rest for God’s people. Joshua did not provide it (verse 8) when they entered the promised land; therefore a Sabbath rest remains for God’s people to enter into. That rest is nothing other than Christ and His atonement for the sins of His people. The greater Sabbath rest is Christ’s righteousness that fulfilled the Law and is imputed to those who believe in Him. We strive to enter that rest which Christ provides because the word of God, (the Law), is sharp and revealing. It is so sharp that is cuts us up (because of our unrighteousness) and so revealing of our thoughts and intentions that we are naked and ashamed before the One to whom we must give account. Rest, then, is pictured as life lived in union with Christ. Resting in Christ’s finished work on the cross, rather than in our own works, is the Sabbath rest that is reserved for God’s people.  

So How Do We Rest Restfully? 

Now that we have walked through two key texts on rest, what do we do with that knowledge? First, we must meditate on the three underpinnings of the Commandment to observe the Sabbath. Do we see rest as a celebration of our design? Seeing rest as a celebration makes us delight in our Creator for making us in His image. Do we regularly take days off from our work as a declaration of our freedom from being bound to the ways of the world? Seeing rest as freedom allows us to stop feeling guilty for not working on our to-do lists, because we know we are free to serve God above all! Do we rest from work, knowing that rest may mean less money, as an act of trust in God as our Provider? Seeing rest as an act of trust is a regular reminder that we walk by faith and not by sight. These three questions are a helpful place to start when looking at why we all need to rest regularly and enjoy that rest, too.  

Secondly, we need to let the implications of the greater Sabbath rest become present in our lives. Because Christ has proven us before the Father (made us righteous), we no longer need to prove ourselves through over-work. Because we’ve been given an identity in Christ, we no longer need to make an identity for ourselves in our work. Because we’ve been given fulfillment in Christ, we no longer need to chase satisfaction in climbing the ladder in corporations. Because every selfish motive for work (self-worth, fulfillment, prominence, and glory) is revealed as void and unsatisfying, we can rest satisfied that we are complete in Christ. Rest, as we learn in Hebrews, is ultimately found in Christ. Therefore, our focus in rest is to be Christ, our Sabbath Rest. To rest without a focus on Christ and what He has done for us, is to rob ourselves of the benefits of greater (more fulfilling) rest. This is why I argue that rest is not so much the absence of activity, but the freedom from our daily duties to work and toil, that we might actively pursue that which satisfies us most in Christ. If we know that Christ is the greatest rest anyone of us can experience, then we must pursue satisfaction in Christ as we rest. We are all likely familiar with John Piper’s famous declaration that “God is most glorified in us when we are most satisfied in Him.” What I am contending is that this principle from Piper is just as important when we are resting as it is when we are talking about the Christian life in general. So when we practice regular rest, our guiding principle needs to be, “What can I do that will make me more satisfied in Christ?” This is the key to enduring and genuine rest, that allows us to enter our work week ready and wanting to leverage every moment for the glory of God by serving people and working with excellence. And isn’t that what we want most as Christians, to leverage every moment for the glory of God? 

As a last word of advice, I encourage you to PLAN YOUR REST. If we do not actively plan things that satisfy us in Christ, we will passively waste our rest either being busy-bodies that are tired on Monday or as lazy-bodies not ready for Monday. So plan to spend time in the word of God, growing in the knowledge of your incredible Savior. Plan to spend time in prayer, growing in your zealousness to see God answer the prayers of His saint. Plan to spend some time sharing your faith with friends or a stranger, increasing in your desire to see God worshipped by all and all delighting in Him. Plan to spend time with your family, soaking up those precious moments God has given you, letting gratitude wash over you because God has given you infinitely more than you deserve. Plan to spend time in nature, marveling at God’s creation that cries out in praise and beauty to its Creator. Whatever it is that satisfies you in Christ, plan it in advance so that your to-do lists and other things do not rob you of satisfaction in Christ. May God bless you with restful rest as you seek satisfaction in your Savior, Jesus Christ our Lord.  

Endnote: Concerning Deuteronomy 5:12-15, I rely heavily on Tim Keller’s treatment of it in his book, Every Good Endeavor, chapter twelve. 

Garet Halbert is a member of FCC and serves as an Elder in Training. He and his wife, Heidi, have two little girls, Selah and Sophia.

                                                                   

Posted in: Christian Living, Uncategorized

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The Impossibility of Rogue Christianity

Rogue Christianity is a growing trend and problem in our culture. More and more people happily identify themselves as Christians without submitting their lives to a local church. The situation has a bit of irony in it since our society has produced more options for choosing a church than any other society in the history of the world. Somehow, the overwhelming amount of choices out there still have not met the fancy of millions who call themselves Christian. In contrast, Christians who are living in persecuted nations risk their lives to be a part of the one church that is within their reach. Personal preferences are not even a consideration. It seems they intuitively know something that is lost on our culture about the necessity of the church.

The problem is not that we need more flavors of churches to suit a wider variety of people. Rather, the problem is a fundamental misunderstanding that many of the basic commands of the Christian life assume membership to a local church. In other words, it is impossible to be obedient to all that Christ has commanded without being a member of a local church. There are many things that could be said about this but let’s look at just three areas of the Christian life that can only be carried out within the context of the local church.

  1. Submission to Authority

Obey your leaders and submit to them, for they are keeping watch over your souls, as those who will have to give an account. Let them do this with joy and not with groaning, for that would be of no advantage to you. -Hebrews 13:17

Authority has become a dirty word in our culture – sometimes for good reason. A cursory glance at history will provide no shortage of cult leaders and tyrannical rulers who have wielded their authority to advance their own evil agendas. But authority is not an evil thing in and of itself. In fact, church authority is a gift from God by which we are lovingly protected and equipped to live out the Christian life. Leaders in the church have been tasked with the responsibility of keeping watch over our souls and they will have to give an account for how they carry out that task. The primary way that they do this is by teaching and instructing from the Word of God (2 Tim 3:16, 2 Tim 4:2, 1 Tim 4:16). It is in being taught and instructed by the God-ordained authorities within the church that the saints are equipped for ministry, brought to maturity in their Christian life, and guarded from deception (Eph 4:11-16, Acts 20:28). Those who are rejecting the church are rejecting God’s means for their spiritual growth and protection.

  1. Mutual Accountability

Brothers, if anyone is caught in any transgression, you who are spiritual should restore him in a spirit of gentleness. -Galatians 6:1

Church is often thought of as the place in which you go to say hi to few people you hardly know, listen to a spiritual pep talk that will aid in getting you through the next week, and perhaps even give an obligatory donation in the offering box. Spiritual duties for the week – check.  However, Scripture does not allow for such a narrow understanding. Christians who are a part of the same local church have an obligation to look out for each other’s spiritual well-being. We are accountable to each other in discipleship and the mutual sharpening of our spiritual lives (Heb 10:24, Titus 2:4-6). Often, this will mean that we may have to bring correction to the ones we love to stop them from drifting in a wrong direction or restore them when they have sinned (Gal 6:1, Heb 12:15, Matt 18:15). Often, this will mean that we may be the recipients of loving and needed correction. Despite what the culture tells us, correcting someone in sin is not judgmental. On the contrary, correction can be one of the most loving things a person can do for another as it may be the thing that keeps them from their own destruction. As the writer of the book of Proverbs says, “Better is an open rebuke than hidden love” (Prov 27:5). Carrying out the commands to care for others in this way requires much more than mere attendance at a church, it requires involving ourselves in the lives of others and allowing others to involve themselves in our lives. Those who neglect the church altogether, neglect the accountability that Christ has designed and commanded for His people.

  1. Neighborly Responsibility

So then, as we have opportunity, let us do good to everyone, and especially to those who are of the household of faith. -Galatians 6:10

The third and final commandment that assumes church membership is the obligation to do good to those who are of the household of faith. The scriptures are replete with commandments for believers to sacrifice themselves, their time, possessions, and personal giftedness for the good of the church (Rom12:3-8). While some may protest that their efforts in the realm of social philanthropy fulfill these commands, the scripture’s primary burden, and thus the burden for every believer, is for those within the Body of Christ (Rom 12:13, 2 Cor 9:12, Heb 6:10). In fact, the apostle John goes so far as to say that those who shut their hearts to the brothers in need are void of the love of God (1 Jn 3:17). The reason for the emphasis of giving of ourselves to our brothers and sisters is simple: “By this we know love, that he laid down his life for us, and we ought to lay down our lives for the brothers” (1 Jn 3:16). Those who neglect the church cannot fulfill these commands and therefore cannot and do not emulate the Lord they claim to love.

 When it comes down to it, the Christian life was not meant to be lived apart from the church. The very essence of what it means to be a Christian is wrapped up in our relationships to our fellow believers within the local church. This means that those who only attend church, like those who neglect church altogether, are not actually living out the Christian life. Christians are Christians because they claim to be followers of Christ and just as Christ came to serve His people and not to be served, so must we (Mark 10:45, Jn 10:15, 1 Jn 3:16). All three of these categories, (submission to authority, mutual accountability, and neighborly responsibility), function both as a means by which God demonstrates His love in our lives and a means by which we demonstrate our love for and obedience to Christ. In fact, how ever we treat Christ’s church, whether with engagement or apathy, is ultimately how we are treating Christ Himself (Acts 9:4).

And he will place the sheep on his right, but the goats on the left. Then the King will say to those on his right, ‘Come, you who are blessed by my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world. For I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me, I was naked and you clothed me, I was sick and you visited me, I was in prison and you came to me.’ Then the righteous will answer him, saying, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry and feed you, or thirsty and give you drink? And when did we see you a stranger and welcome you, or naked and clothe you? And when did we see you sick or in prison and visit you?’ And the King will answer them, ‘Truly, I say to you, as you did it to one of the least of these my brothers, you did it to me.’ -Matthew 25:33-40 (emphasis added)

Logan Cauthen is a member of FCC and is currently pursuing a Masters of Divinity at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. He is married to Lindsey and they have two daughters.

 

Posted in: Church life

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We Have An Advocate

From John Bunyan’s The Work of Jesus Christ as an Advocate

 

The Apostle John, holding 1 John 2:1

1 John 2:1b. And if anyone sins, we have an Advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous

The best saints are most sensible of their sins, and most apt to make mountains of their mole hills. Satan also, as has been already hinted, doth labour greatly to prevail with them to sin, and to provoke their God against them, by pleading what is true, or by surmising evilly of them, to the end they may be accused by him (Job 2:9). Great is his malice toward them, great is his diligence in seeking their destruction; wherefore greatly doth he desire to sift, to try, and winnow them, if perhaps he may work in their flesh to answer his design-that is, to break out in sinful acts, that he may have by law to accuse them to their God and Father. Wherefore, for their sakes this text abides, that they may see that, when they have sinned, “they have an Advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous.”

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My Daughter the Kitty?

by Gabriel Pech

A couple months ago my almost-five-year old, beautiful, blonde-haired, blue-eyed daughter, Mykah, said to me over lunch, “Daddy, I want to be a boy!” This was a critical moment for me as a parent. I wasn’t surprised by her question, nor was I even caught off-guard. But it was still a critical moment. How would you handle this question?

Our culture today would suggest that my wife and I embrace her desire and immediately start calling her “Mike” and referring to her as a him and claim her as our firstborn son. The culture would not only suggest this, but would celebrate us as exemplary parents for embracing our daughter for “who he really is.”

Here’s the thing though… Earlier that morning she was a kitten named “Summer.” By Alicia Harvey (originally posted to Flickr as Blue Eyed Baby) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia CommonsAnd this morning she was a rescue dog named “Everest.” Who my daughter “really is” should not and cannot be determined by what she feels at any given moment. I kid you not, she switches characters throughout the day faster than I can keep up with; and in fact, I spend more time trying to figure out who I am as we play, than actually play.

She’s five–she doesn’t know what she wants. If I let her, she would eat cake for every meal and make herself sick by only drinking chocolate milk.

In this video, one of my favorite superhero actors, Chris Hemsworth (Thor) has a similar interaction with his daughter. How does he handle it? In his words, he tells his daughter, “You can be whatever you want to be.” It gets laughs from the audience but it’s not funny. He is pushing the same worldview that the recent kid movie, Zootopia, pushed: You can be whatever you want to be.

This worldview, while seemingly innocent enough, especially when said to a five-year-old, can have devastating effects, especially in regards to gender.

The big lie that Satan whispered into Eve’s ear in the garden was that God was withholding happiness from her, that He didn’t truly want what’s best for her (Genesis 3). In essence, Satan was saying that the sovereign God of the universe, the One who rules all things, did not actually know what was best for His creation; and that she, a mere finite being, could better determine her fate.By Internet Archive Book Images [No restrictions], via Wikimedia Commons

Do you see where I am going with this? That lie back in the garden is the same venomous lie that is being spewed today. The lie that says that somehow God messed up when creating you as male or female, and therefore you can, and should, decide for yourself. It’s the same lie wrapped up in new language and propagated not from a snake, but from the popular media.

So how did I reply to my sweet innocent little girl’s request to be a boy? I tenderly held her face, looked deep into her big blue eyes, and told her that God knew exactly what He was doing when He created her as a girl (Psalm 139:13 anybody?). I told her that living out her life as a girl will bring God great joy and glory, and then I affirmed all that is “girly” in her, showering her with love and affection. I did not rudely dismiss her request but rather told her of a sovereign God who loved her and made her to be a girl that glorifies Him. She smiled big, took a bite, and then told me we were now playing Rapunzel and I was the horse, Max.

As Christians, we must reject the worldview that lies and says, “You can be whatever you want to be,” as if that “whatever” is better than what you were originally designed for. We must teach our children that there is good and sovereign God who knew exactly what He was doing when He created them as a beautiful little girl or handsome little boy.

Gabriel Pech is a member of FCC.

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Suffering and Dying for the Glory of God

by Deanna Hanson

I recently lost my dad and my mother-in-law to Stage 4 illnesses. My dad was diagnosed with Stage 4 Liver Disease and died within 3 weeks. My mother-in-law’s diagnosis came and allowed us to enjoy 2 great years with her before her body was overcome by Stage 4 Lung Cancer. Both of my parents experienced death and suffering so differently. Our human nature does not want to endure hardship like a good soldier (2 Timothy 2:3), follow Christ’s example (1 Peter 2:21), or rejoice in suffering (Romans 5:3). But it is at Calvary, at the cross, where we meet suffering on God’s terms. My mother-in-law, Sue Hanson, achieved this for most of her life, but it was most evident during her last 2 years here on earth.

John and I attended the 2005 Desiring God’s National Conference in Minneapolis entitled “Suffering and the Sovereignty of God.” We were deeply affected by the messages. We heard testimonies from Joni Eareckson Tada, Steve Saint, and John Piper about the hope and joy that can come from immense heartache and affliction. Steve Saint explained how suffering is relative and different for each person. “My definition of suffering is our expectation divided by our experience.” He goes on to say that “people who suffer want people who have suffered to tell them there is hope.

William Blake [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

William Blake, “Pestilence”

They are justifiably suspicious of people who appear to have lived lives of ease. There is no doubt in my mind that this is the reason that Jesus suffered in every way that we do, while he was here. First Peter 2:21 says, ‘[Your] suffering is all part of what God has called you to. Christ, who suffered for you, is your example. Follow in his steps’ (NLT).” Sue understood that this was God’s sovereign plan for her life and followed Christ’s example. She lived her last two years demonstrating His love for others while she was sick, continuously serving and encouraging those around her. She radiated joy and hopefulness when she shared about the cancer that was spreading through her body. While she was suffering and dying, Sue did just as Philippians 2:3 says: “in humility count others more significant than yourselves.” Her example reminded me of what Joni said at this 2005 conference:

“To this you were called because Christ suffered for you, leaving you this kind of example that you should follow. He endured the cross for the joy that was set before him (Heb 12:2). Should we expect to do less? So then, join me; boast in your afflictions. Delight in your infirmities. Glory in your weaknesses, for then you know that Christ’s power rests in you (2 Corinthians 12:9). You might [have cancer] on all sides, but you’re not crushed. You might be perplexed, but you’re not in despair. You might be knocked down, but you’re not knocked out. Because it says in 2 Corinthians 4:7-12 that every day we experience something of the death of the Lord Jesus Christ, so that in turn we might experience the power of the life of Jesus in these bodies of ours.”

Let us learn from Sue and Joni and die to ourselves each morning and live in Christ for the glory of our great God!

If you would like to listen to the 2005 conference messages from this Series, the video and audio are available for free by clicking here: Suffering and the Sovereignty of God.

Deanna Hanson is a member of FCC.

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The Mission of the Church

by William Judson

What is the role of the church in the Great Commission? Her role is to go out in the power of the Spirit, in the name of Christ, for the glory of the Father to make disciples of all ethnic groups in the world. Jesus, having been given all authority, promises to be with us as we seek to make disciples (converts) among all the nations. But that raises the question: to whom do we go? Do we go to those who already have access to the gospel, a church on every corner? Are the people in our offices and worksites “unreached?” To understand these questions, we need to go to the Scriptures.

The Great Commission is given to us in Matthew 28. Jesus sends us out in his name, to proclaim his death and resurrection. We see this authority and power manifested in the book of Acts. Specifically in Acts 1:8, Jesus recommissions those gathered by telling them that they will be his witnesses in Jerusalem, in all Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth. As Acts unfolds we see the apostles going into every town, proclaiming and reasoning with the Jews that Jesus is the Messiah and that he has risen. This proclamation results in persecution, which serves as God’s catalyst to send out workers into his harvest of the nations (Acts 11:19; Matt. 9:37-38).

By London Missionary Society, National Portrait Gallery, via Wikimedia Commons

Bechuana Congregation and David Livingston, via The London Missionary Society

God’s plan has always been for the nations. From his covenant with Abraham (Gen. 15; 17) to the Great Commission (Matt. 28; Acts 1:8), from Peter’s vision in Acts 10 to the return of Christ (Rev 5; 7). God is seeking to glorify himself among all peoples, tribes, and languages. God has promised that there will be a people from every tribe, language, and nation that will confess that Jesus is Lord and that the Father raised him from the dead. So we go to those who have never heard.

The unreached and unengaged are those with little to no access to the gospel. To bring their utter plight into view I want to paraphrase something I heard David Platt, President of the International Mission Board, say at a conference. He said, “If every Christian in the world were to go out and share the gospel with every person they knew, and that by God’s grace every person truly repented and believed, and then they told every person they knew, and so on, there would still be 2.9 billion unreached and unengaged peoples in the world.” Currently, there are 2.9 billion people in the world who are not giving the glory due to God. There are approximately 7.5 billion people in the world, most of whom, if we’re honest, aren’t Christians. But within that group, about 40%, have never heard the gospel of Jesus Christ. They have no access to the Scriptures or a local church. They have probably never met a Christian. They stand condemned before God unless they repent and believe in Christ as Lord and Savior.

In Romans 10, Paul states: “How, then, can they call on him they have not believed in? And how can they believe without hearing about him? And how can they hear without a preacher? And how can they preach unless they are sent?” As a church, we need faithful senders and faithful goers. We need those to be sent to those who have never heard. We need one another to reach the unreached. We need one another to accomplish Matthew 28 and Romans 15:20. Our aim should be to reach those where Christ has not been named until we have no more work left in this world.

William Judson is a member of FCC.

Posted in: missions

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A Multidimensional God

Zephaniah 3:17 The LORD your God is in your midst, a victorious warrior. He will exult over you with joy, He will be quiet in his love, He will rejoice over you with shouts of joy.

God is not two-dimensional. He’s a complex, furious, loving, tender, laughing slaughterer of His enemies. There is a perennial tendency to flatten God’s character, to engage in reductionism for the sake of simplicity. Have you ever heard someone – or yourself – say,

See page for author [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

“Ezekiel’s Wheel”

“I just can’t worship a God who would…” There’s the sinful, creaturely impulse to make God in our own image. So much mischief follows when we flip the direction of image-bearing. When God created man and woman, he created us in His image; in our sin and rebellion, in our limitations and confusions, we think we should return the favor.

Isn’t it funny how some insist that God receives us just as we are, but refuse to receive Him just as He is.

By Jessica Winstead (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia CommonsWho would want a Hallmark God anyway? In what world does sentimental doting Grandpappy God belong? A world made of Precious Moments and Thomas Kincade’s perfection of light? Who lives there? We don’t. We live in a dirty, sweaty, smelly, dusty world: this world that Jesus is redeeming, this world in which His Church is advancing His Kingdom, is a world of pain in childbirth and snuggly toddlers; fighting against thorns and the joy of freely sharing what God has given; temptations to sins that would crush us and the delight of a cold glass of water. Sin infecting us all, and the image of God in us all. Total depravity and common grace.

And in all that messiness, we have a God who can handle it all. Because He doesn’t break bruised reeds, He doesn’t snuff out smoldering wicks, He leads justice to victory. He smashes the teeth of the wicked. He allows the wicked to prosper for a time, and He takes up the cause of widows and orphans. He directs elections, He clothes the grasses of the field, He comforts the lonely, He triumphs over mockers and liars and those who oppress the poor, He causes the mountain goats to give birth, He allows the abominations of the Amorites and Americans to reach their full measure, He tenderly consoles the weak in faith and He castigates the strong in their pride.

As someone else has said well, we must take all of God for all of life. He’s a multidimensional God. We need Him to be.

Joe Bancks is a member of FCC.

Posted in: Biblical Counseling

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